History of Mathematics : Famous Mathematicians

History of Mathematics : Famous Mathematicians


Hi, I’m Steve Jones, and I’m going to talk
about some famous mathematicians, actually, only two. The first, Pythagoras, some four
thousand years ago, three-and-a-half thousand years ago, Greek, and Newton, just three or
four hundred years ago, English. Very different people. Pythagoras was very famous for his
theorem of right angle triangles, the square on the hypotenuse is equal to the square on
the other two sides. Newton, on the other hand, was very famous, not only for his theoretical
mathematical developments, but also for his developments in ideas in physics. And in the
case of Newton, the more modern scientist, is the person that we think of as the mathematician
of today. The mathematician who actually creates an idea, and looks at the practical applications
of it. The Greeks were not interested in the practical applications at all. They were more
interested in the theory. And they enjoyed sitting ’round talking to each other and explaining
and…and…and arguing about these different theorems. They wouldn’t ever try to create
something which would physically check the theorems they were making. This was very different.
By the…by the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, mathematicians had to look at the
theories, and work with them. So there is a fundamental change in the famous mathematicians
of the early Greeks, Pythagoras and Euclid, and later the Newtons and Liebenitzs of Europe.

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Comments

  1. eHow, i am greek and i love how you explain tha way of Greeks by sitting around arguing and talking too much without checking the practical side of their theories! That is a fine criticism for my people and really made me laugh!! However their theories proved to be correct even though they hadn't really put them on the table :)}

  2. one that is not really mentioned, though maybe not as famous as Pythagoras or Newton, would have to be Euclid, and maybe Descartes.

  3. ?? "The square on the hypotenuse is equal to the square on the other two sides"??
    This is an example of confused thinking.

  4. Pythagoras gave us the rules for circles and triangles
    Newton showed us the invisible circles and triangles at work in the natural world with his newtonian physics and calculus

  5. @wrstark It is. The sum of the areas of the two sides is equal to the area of the hypotenuse. Thus each side is "squared", giving you an area. And therefore a^2 + b^2 = c^2.

  6. MATHEMATICIANS GO CALCULATE THEIR OBLITERATION! GEEZ THIS GUY MUST BE A BORING OLD SOCK!!! GET A LIFE! ITS TOO SHORT TO BE OBSESSED WITH DOTS!

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